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Pivotal Moments in Nursing: Leaders Who Changed the Path of a Profession, Volume II

You may know their names, but do you know the stories behind the acclaim? Once again, the authors of Pivotal Moments in Nursing: Leaders Who Changed the Path of a Profession bring you the stories behind some of nursing's living legends.

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You may know their names, but do you know the stories behind the acclaim? Once again, the authors of Pivotal Moments in Nursing: Leaders Who Changed the Path of a Profession bring you the stories behind some of nursing's living legends. Eleven leaders were selected for volume II of this bestselling series.

Richard Carmona transcended the poverty that threatened to engulf him, along with many of his childhood friends and family members from the ghetto, to become a nurse, a surgeon, and ultimately the surgeon general of the United States.

M. Elizabeth Carnegie didn't set out to right many of the wrongs of racial injustice in nursing and healthcare, but when she found herself faced with accepting the status quo or making a stand, she chose to stand and be counted, and count she did.

Leah Curtin, known to many as the "mother of nursing ethics," first made her name as a young fossil-hunter who discovered several previously undocumented brachiopods, but her best work came later as she stepped up to ask the hard questions and put ethics center stage in nursing and healthcare.

Imogene King is an internationally recognized nurse theorist whose landmark works have been read by generations of nurses and have literally changed nursing education and practice in several countries.

Ruth Watson Lubic made families the focal point of her career, helping to establish legendary birthing centers in the United States, and went on to become the first nurse awarded the MacArthur Fellowship "genius" grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Margaret McClure decided to ask what made nurses stay in certain hospitals? instead of the more traditional approach of asking what made them leave. This question ultimately led to what is now universally known as the Magnet Recognition Program.

Marla Salmon was a hippie who was compelled by upbringing and compassion to try to change the plight of the underserved and marginalized peoples of the world. She has done this in many notable ways, including serving as chief nurse of the US and as the United States first nurse delegate to the World Health Organization.

Judith Shamian survived the ravages of three wars during her formative years and learned that the only way to achieve her goals was to stay strong and hold onto her values. This approach led her to the top echelon of the Canadian healthcare system.

Grayce Sills saw firsthand the grim nature of psychiatric treatments of the 1940s and 1950s. She has been leading and working across interdisciplinary boundaries ever since to help ensure that psychiatric patients are treated humanely and given every opportunity to succeed.

Kirsten Stallknecht went from the position of charge nurse to the head of the Danish Nurses Organization literally overnight. She held this position for 28 years; in the process, she negotiated and bargained with the Danish government and brought about sweeping changes in how nurses were treated and compensated.

Florence Wald found her professional passion once she was introduced to the holistic philosophy of hospice care. From that point forward, she became an advocate of death with dignity. Today, she is known at the mother of U.S. hospice care, having engineered the vision that led to the first hospice in the United States.

About the Authors

Beth P. Houser, DNSc, FNP, NEA-BC, is chief nursing officer of Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine in Texas. Previous leadership roles include director of critical care and telemetry at Scottsdale Healthcare and director of nursing research and the Magnet ((a designation for hospitals that indicates nursing care is at the highest level) project for John C. Lincoln-North Mountain in Arizona. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. She guest lectures at national conferences and publishes on both leadership and Magnet. Her articles have appeared in nursing leadership journals such as the Nursing Administration Quarterly. Houser is coauthor of Pivotal Moments in Nursing, Volume I and Words of Wisdom from Pivotal Nurse Leaders.

Kathy N. Player, EdD, RN, MSN-MBA, is president of Grand Canyon University. She previously held the positions of provost and chief academic officer, Grand Canyon University, and dean of the Ken Blanchard College of Business and the College of Entrepreneurship, chair of professional studies, and director for the RN-BSN program. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. She lobbies actively at both the local and national levels for nurses and nursing issues. Player is coauthor of Pivotal Moments in Nursing, Volume I and Words of Wisdom form Pivotal Nurse Leaders. Her articles have appeared in nursing leadership journals such as the Nurse Leader She has been interviewed by leading nursing publications such as American Nurse Today and Nursing Spectrum about the nursing shortage.